The Strengths of Suburbia for the Sake of Mission

Many of us are aware of the challenges of being missional in suburbia, but few talk about using the strengths of suburbia for the sake of mission in this world.  I love what Todd Heistand writes here:

I was leading a seminar on this topic recently and we were lucky to have a city planner as part of our meeting. He pointed out that the biggest gift that people have in Suburbia is housing. I was struck by how right he was. I don’t care if you live in a small one-bedroom apartment or a single-family home in a cul-de-sac with a white picket fence around the yard. The fact is, you have a warm place to lay your head each night and there are millions of people in this world who don’t. So, as much as some of us like to rip the single-family home that promotes individualism and isolation, it is this very home that makes us some of the luckiest people in the world.

So, the question that therefore stands in front of us is this: “How will we take this amazing gift of housing and use it for the sake of the Kingdom?” After all, owning a home is not evil. Owning a home is not sinful. The problem is in when we end up serving this gift rather than letting it serve us.

As good churchgoing Christians, we love to talk about stewardship. It’s about time we stop thinking about stewardship only in terms of our money. And for starters, we need to discover what it means to be good stewards of our homes.

Perhaps the easiest answer lies in rediscovering the simple practice of hospitality. It is in this practice that our greatest strength has the opportunity to meet one of Suburbia’s greatest needs. That need? Isolation.

  • Read Heistand's whole article, "Rethinking the Evils of Suburbia"
  • Read my article, "Open the Door of Your Home" for more practical ideas